See what’s going down in BC’s Ancient Forests

Ancient Forest Alliance, Vancouver Island, British Columbia: Giant Redcedar Stump, Klanawa Valley

Almost 80% of Vancouver Island’s productive old-growth forests have been logged, including 90% of the valley bottoms where the largest trees grow and the richest biodiversity resides. Stumps as wide as 16 feet (5 metres) in diameter have been found freshly cut. The oldest stump to be dated in British Columbia was from a tree 1,835 years old! Below are photographs of only some of the big stumps that have been found. How many others are there? How many more will there be before this destruction is stopped?

Some viewers may find this content to be very disturbing. Viewer discretion is advised.

Ancient Forest Alliance, Vancouver Island, British Columbia: Giant Redcedar Stump, Walbran Valley

Upper Walbran Stump
Circumference: 44ft
Diameter: 14ft
Species: Redcedar
Valley: Upper Walbran Valley, Vancouver Island
Estimated Date Cut: 2006
Photographer: TJ Watt

Ancient Forest Alliance, Vancouver Island, British Columbia: Giant Redcedar Stump, Gordon River Valley

Gordon River Stump
Circumference: 38ft
Diameter: 12ft
Species: Redcedar
Valley: Gordon River, Port Renfrew Area, Vancouver Island
Estimated Date Cut: July 2007
Photographer: TJ Watt

Ancient Forest Alliance, Vancouver Island, British Columbia: Giant Redcedar Stump, Gordon River Valley

Gordon River Stump
Circumference: 40ft
Diameter: 13ft
Species: Redcedar
Valley: Gordon River, Port Renfrew area, Vancouver Island
Estimated Date Cut: March 2010
Photographer: TJ Watt

Ancient Forest Alliance, Vancouver Island, British Columbia: Giant Redcedar Stump, Gordon River Valley

Gordon River – Hollow Stump
Circumference: 39ft
Diameter: 12.5ft
Species: Redcedar
Valley: Gordon River, Port Renfrew area, Vancouver Island
Estimated Date Cut: March 2010
Photographer: TJ Watt

Ancient Forest Alliance, Vancouver Island, British Columbia: Giant Redcedar Stump, Bugaboo Creek, Gordon River Valley

Bugaboo Creek Stump
Circumference: 45ft
Diameter: 15ft
Species: Redcedar
Valley: Bugaboo Creek, Gordon River Valley, Port Renfrew area, Vancouver Island
Estimated Date Cut: 2008
Photographer: TJ Watt

Ancient Forest Alliance, Vancouver Island, British Columbia: Giant Redcedar Stump, Gordon River Valley

Gordon River Fresh Stump
Circumference: 44ft
Diameter: 14ft
Species: Redcedar
Valley: Gordon River, Port Renfrew area, Vancouver Island
Estimated Date Cut: March 2010
Photographer: TJ Watt

Ancient Forest Alliance, Vancouver Island, British Columbia: Giant Redcedar Stump, Gordon River Valley

Gordon River Massive Stump
Circumference: 45ft
Diameter: 15ft
Species: redcedar
Valley: Gordon River, Port Renfrew area, Vancouver Island
Estimated Date Cut: 2010
Photographer: TJ Watt

Ancient Forest Alliance, Vancouver Island, British Columbia: Giant Redcedar Stump, Bugaboo Creek, Gordon River Valley

Bugaboo Creek Stump
Circumference: 47ft
Diameter: 15ft
Species: Redcedar
Valley: Bugaboo Creek, Gordon River Valley, Port Renfrew area, Vancouver Island
Estimated Date Cut: 2008
Photographer: TJ Watt

Ancient Forest Alliance, Vancouver Island, British Columbia: Redcedar Stump, Walbran Valley

Upper Walbran Clearcut
Circumference: 34ft
Diameter: 11ft
Species: Redcedar
Valley: Upper Walbran Valley, Vancouver Island
Estimated Date Cut: 2006
Photographer: TJ Watt

Ancient Forest Alliance, Vancouver Island, British Columbia: Giant Redcedar Stump, Bugaboo Creek, Gordon River Valley

Bugaboo Creek Clearcut
Circumference: 35ft
Diameter: 11ft
Species: Redcedar
Valley: Bugaboo Creek, Gordon River Valley, Port Renfrew area, Vancouver Island
Estimated Date Cut: 2007
Photographer: TJ Watt

Ancient Forest Alliance, Vancouver Island, British Columbia: Giant Redcedar Stump, Gordon River Valley

Massive Redcedar Stump
Circumference: Nearly 40ft
Species: Redcedar
Valley: Gordon River Valley, Port Renfrew area, Vancouver Island
Estimated Date Cut: Early 2010

Ancient Forest Alliance, Vancouver Island, British Columbia: Giant Redcedar Stump, Gordon River Valley

Ancient Redcedar Stump
Species: Redcedar
Valley: Gordon River Valley, Port Renfrew area, Vancouver Island

Since coming to power, the NDP government has so far continued with the destructive status quo of massive old-growth forest liquidation. Despite their 2017 election-platform promise to manage BC’s old-growth forests based on the “ecosystem-based management” approach of the Great Bear Rainforest (where most of the forests on BC’s Central and North Coast were set aside from logging), they haven’t made any concrete policies to protect ancient forests.

Now is the time to make the transition to sustainable logging in second-growth forests instead, and to protect what little remains of these incredible ecosystems.

Amazing organizations like the Ancient Forest Alliance represent the main hope we have of saving what little remains of these ancient forest ecosystems. Please support them in protecting British Columbia’s precious old-growth forests and forestry jobs.

Photo Credit
Photography by TJ Watt, Ancient Forest Alliance

Ancient Forest Alliance
Street Address: Central Building, #303-620 View Street, Victoria, BC
Mailing Address: Victoria Main PO, PO Box 8459, Victoria, BC V8W 3S1
Phone: 250-896-4007
Email: info@ancientforestalliance.org
Website: www.ancientforestalliance.org

Featured Image
Klanawa Valley Giant Stump: This massive redcedar stump was discovered by the Ancient Forest Alliance, freshly cut in the Klanawa Valley, northwest of Nitinat Lake on Vancouver Island, in June 2011.

Source: Biggest Stumps – Ancient Forest Alliance

By |2019-01-14T23:43:21+00:00April 10th, 2018|Sustainability, Top Stories|9 Comments

9 Comments

  1. Megan May 22, 2018 at 11:59 pm - Reply

    Thank you for sharing. 🙁 🙁 🙁

  2. Joseph Watson June 4, 2018 at 11:12 am - Reply

    Maybe if a botanist was legitimizing the statements and photographs it would add to the rear problem, if any. NEW growth; younger trees add more oxygen than old growth. Yes, the ancient trees are wonderful to observe, but just suppose that several, not all, were selected to help the growth of others in order to ensure that in the future there will be ancient giants standing for future generations to enjoy.

  3. Dave Justice July 7, 2018 at 11:49 pm - Reply

    I can understand why no one commented after Joseph.
    Well said.

  4. Jordan July 7, 2018 at 11:55 pm - Reply

    Well said Joseph. It seams like a lot of people ignore those facts and virtue signal. Watch the Lion King guys, there’s a circle of life…

  5. david erpenbeck August 10, 2018 at 12:01 pm - Reply

    What a travesty. Some politico must be getting their pockets lined.

  6. Louis Ryan (biologist) August 21, 2018 at 7:38 pm - Reply

    Josephs comment has actually been disproved. The larger trees absorb more CO2 and produce oxygen. The new studies are available on a google search. We need to preserve old growth for many reasons besides their ability to off set our pollution. They hold the key to the diversity we need to continue to survive on this planet. They also share some of our DNA.

  7. island_girl September 6, 2018 at 4:44 pm - Reply

    You had me until I noticed the dates on these images range from 2006-2010. It comes across that this is a current problem and a fault of the NDP, who were not in power during that time. Very misleading.

    • Joshua October 18, 2018 at 4:20 pm - Reply

      This practice is still happening, with many cut logs to prove this. Look on Google Earth around Port Renfrew, Walbran, and Nitnat, for example, if you’re around Victoria. It’s happening all over there. Then drive up Gordon Main and turn left anywhere near Renfrew and see for yourself. This article is not actually misleading, though I agree that more recent pictures would be helpful.

  8. Clive Delmonte September 7, 2018 at 1:57 pm - Reply

    Do you really think it’s appropriate or helpful to use this disaster for political gain? Logging these old-growth trees is happening right now – under an NDP government – it happened under the previous Liberals, and under the NDP before that, and so on into the 1800s. Bringing attention to the practice is meant to stop it, not score political points. Geeesh!

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